Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Show Yourself Some Valentine's Day Self-love at SCWC


Yes, it's February and this weekend is the Southern California Writers Conference here in San Diego.  I always look forward to this conference with great expectations, knowing I'll learn a lot, even as I teach a couple workshops!

1. I know I've said all this before, but bear with me as I remind you of a few reason to attend SCWC:
To find your "tribe"! The most important reason of all—we all need people in our life that "get" us and "get" our writing...You can find them at SCWC!

2. To meet industry professionals, and not just see them at a panel. Where else can you chat with agents and editors and successful authors in an informal setting like coffee or drinks? (Too many conferences are "cattle calls" where the pros all hang out together and you never actually meet anyone except other first-timers.)


One of the industry pros you'll meet is my friend and client Gayle Carline, whose newest (and best!) mystery arrives on Friday, Feb 14 just in time for Valentine's Day and SCWC!


3. To get professional eyes on your work. Amateur authors often submit their manuscript when they finish their first draft, because they're tired of working on it...but the book isn't ready to be published. Whether you take some pages to read and critique meetings or go to late night (or early ones like mine at 7am Sunday) “rogues,” you'll learn what is working—and what isn't.

4. To learn more about craft and story in hands-on workshops like my new class on POV Sunday afternoon, and to learn what's happening in the industry. From workshops on publishing, marketing, & promotion for your published book, to great speakers who have a wealth of experience to share with you.

5. Because it's so dang fun! We all need to get out and meet other writers and socialize once in a while. And who doesn't want to hang out with a talented, inspiring, upbeat group of creative souls? So, show yourself some love and take yourself to SCWC—your work is worth it and so are you!

And yes, you can register the day it begins—Valentine's Day—hasta pronto!

Monday, December 2, 2019

My "Top Five" Books for 2019


It’s time for me to recommend five books I read in 2019. As always, I leave off the bestsellers and best-known books—those you’ve read about ten times in the last few weeks of top ten books lists. But speaking of bestsellers, I enjoyed Where the Crawdads Sing, and I also have to mention Transcription by Kate Atkinson, because it is brilliant and so well layered and just a wow of a novel. I will keep all my recommendations to books that were published within the last couple of years…but I want to start by mentioning an important book that is coming up in 2020:

Fury: Women’s Lived Experiences During the Trump Era, edited by Amy Roost and Alissa Hirshfeld. You can pre-order this brilliant anthology on Amazon or at the publisher’s site here. (My essay, “Viva La Raza” is included, but that isn’t the main reason to buy the book, now is it?)


A book I helped “birth” that is out now is The Last Getaway by Clay Savage. This book is much harder to describe than to recommend. It’s a fast-paced thrill ride, but it is also funny and oh-so-timely; the two men at the heart of the story—one, a light-fingered young black father from the ‘hood, the other a privileged white boy from Beverly Hills—must learn to work as a perfectly imperfect team. Those of you who read my blog know I've mentioned Clay as an author to watch for—now you can stop watching and start reading!

Here’s my Top Five list, in no particular order:

1. A great choice to gift to someone who reads books on Kindle (It’s currently .99 so the price shouldn’t be a problem—you can get a copy for yourself, too) is Supermen (For America) by Ken Kuhlken. If you or your Kindle-reading buddy love baseball, as I do, this gift will be a home run. If they happened to have grown up in Southern California in the 1960s and come of age in the 70s, then they will surely love the sprawling epic tale that begins with this winning book. There are a few sequels and you will want to read them all. Get them now while they’re cheap!

2. Learning about border politics is pertinent, since I currently live in San Diego or “the greater Tijuana area” as a friend of mine once quipped. But the border region of the southwest U.S. is key to the country’s future—what we are doing there, in the name of U.S. immigration policy, should be of interest to every American. A great book to start with is The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border by Francisco CantĂș. The author put his ideals in action not just by researching the border, and living on it, but by actually serving on the U.S. Border Patrol for a few years before writing about this book. The results are harrowing, unsettling, and poetic. 

3.  Racial tensions are also brewing in the Wisconsin town that is the setting of Jerkwater, by Jamie Zerndt. Native American fishing rights enter into the plot, but this is not simply a novel about that town, or any other “jerkwater” town, it is a novel about life—funny, tragic, and ultimately real. Told from three alternating POVs, Zerndt’s voice as the young Ojibwa woman named Shawna is as authentic as in the two others, who could not be more different. The story is as much about the place as the people, however, and feels as real as your own hometown.

4. I was surprised to learn how much one’s race had to do with getting evicted, which can screw up the rest of your life. Also, how much there was a whole (very profitable) system built up around evicting poor people from their homes and apartments and trailers. If you doubt that the cards are stacked against poor people in America, and most especially poor women of color with children, then read Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond.

5. I like a quirky novel, and I haven’t read one as quirky as If You Tame Me by Kathie Giorgio in quite a while. Starting off with a woman of a certain age who is adopting an iguana, it swiftly brings you into the world of this woman and her nice, but not too exciting neighbor. He has pet birds, parakeets to be precise, and the lizard and the birds feature largely in this book, along with love, attraction, old friends, new politics, and a whole lot more.

Now, get going to a bookseller, or click the links to purchase some of these books on Amazon. Enjoy your end-of-the-year reading and the holidays...
hasta pronto!

Friday, October 4, 2019

Finding a Publishing "Team" Beats "Self" Publishing


No one should self-publish their book.

Now, before you get all excited, what I mean is, no one should self-publish their book alone, with just software to guide them. You need a team to publish professionally, and whether you do that by going through the process with a hybrid publisher (Acorn Publishing, She Writes Press, etc), or you do that by finding your own team, don't go it alone!

One way to find your own team is to join a community like ChapterBuzz. There, you'll find ways to share your work as you go, as well as a vetted list of people who can help you with all the steps required to publish a book you'll be proud of. (Full Disclosure: I'm listed in the new ChapterBuzz directory, and I offer members 10% off my services there, but have not yet worked with anyone from the site.)



However, as you can see, I was the most recent "cover girl" for Books & Buzz, the ChapterBuzz community's online "magazine," which was pretty cool. I think the editor of B&B did a great job with our interview article, since my literary career, and my life in general, is pretty darn hard to encapsulate. 

Enjoy the read and hasta pronto!


Friday, August 23, 2019

It's That Time Again; Six Reasons to Attend SCWC

Well, August is three-quarters over somehow, while I have barely begun to think it is August. We have managed to squeeze in a tiny bit more vacation-ing along with work, lots of family obligations, and all the fun of everyday life on a boat (including some actual sailing), and then this week was “back to school” time for Professor Russel!

Luckily, September follows August and is one of my favorite months, because it contains one of my favorite weekends of the year, when I get to teach (and learn!) at the Southern California Writers Conference in Orange County. If you don't know about SCWC yet, click here.

The schedule for LA17 (in Irvine) is up and the workshops and speakers are listed. There is so much to look forward to: Not just Pitch Witches, but a Pitch Witch query class, my ever-popular (if I do say so myself!) expository class, and an early morning ("early bard") read and critique on Sunday. I'm even teaching a brand-new workshop on content editing—about what it is, exactly, and when writers need it.

My "Pitch Witch" Partner, Marla Miller with Yours Truly

Aspiring writers ask me all the time why they should go to a writers conference and I always tell them that you shouldn't go to just any conference, but that there are some very good reasons to go to SCWC.

1. You'll learn about writing & publishing & marketing, from successful writers, editors, and agents.
2. You'll get feedback on your work-in-progress or that manuscript you think is finished (or is it?)
3. You'll make contacts in the world of publishing that'll help you succeed in this ever-evolving biz.
4. You'll meet your “tribe” and make friends who will understand and support you (I sure have!)
5. You'll get out of your lonely writing room.
6. You'll have a blast!
I hope you can make it to Irvine this year—there's still time to register and to get a hotel room at a discounted SCWC price (if you book a room by Aug 29).
hasta pronto!

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Vacation Brain, and Some Transition Talk

Yes, I've been on "vacation"—lots of moving and packing and unpacking going on, but not a lot of editing has gotten done. Now I'm back aboard "Watchfire" and ready to get back to my life and my work. Unfortunately, I've got Vacation Brain. V.B. is the fuzzy, vague, can't-quite-concentrate feeling that you strive for on vacation, but that you have to shuck like an oyster shell once you return to the real world.


So, here's what I have been thinking about, in spite of V.B.: transitions. Both in life and in writing. Transitions don't get enough love, and they certainly don't get much respect. In life we tend to gloss over other people's life transitions with phrases like "It's just a phase," "this too shall pass," "you'll get over it," and even "get over it!"

In judging an author's writing, editors and agents often say "the transitions were weak" but what exactly does that mean? In my experience, it means that either you took too long to get from plot point A to plot point B, thereby boring the reader, or that it happened too fast and left us wondering, so make sure you know which problem your text suffered from.

Sometimes transitions surprise us unintentionally, and then it isn't really the transition itself that is to blame, but all that came before it. (A surprise can be a good thing in some genres, but not a completely surprising surprise, if you know what I mean. We've all read those, where we say, "WTF? That character would never have done that!")

In order to improve your transitions, you must first find them. You can spot them by highlighting what they are not. Transitions are not usually whole scenes, they are the connective tissue between scenes. There is action/reaction in a scene (a "beat," if you will) and then the scene ends and, at some point, another scene begins. That connecting section is your transition.

Of course, rules are meant to be broken, and sometimes a whole chapter—usually, a very short one—works as a transition in a book. A great example, in a book by Ray Bradbury, was a one-sentence chapter which I'll try to recall here: "Nothing else happened the rest of the night." Great transition, but it won't work in too many books.

Sometimes a transition has to do some heavy lifting, like jumping through space and time, and, unless you're Zane Grey you don't want to use the cliched "Meanwhile, back at the ranch..." So, how do you make those leaps, from breakfast to break-up, or from colonial Bangaladesh to modern-day Bermuda?

The best answer I can give is to read. Read the greats, and see how they do what they do. When you find a great transition, jot it down or highlight it (easy on a Kindle or most other e-reader apps). Go back and re-read them and see which one moves you. Keep a list of them for inspiration. Next time you are stuck, refer to that list. You won't use the transitions word for word, of course, but they can certainly act as a jumping off place.

That's the best I can do with Vacation Brain. Hope it was a little bit helpful...Now for a nap...
hasta pronto!